Bangor Water

Article Title: Current Work

Article Content

Maintaining a water system comes with challenges.   Water main repairs can seem frustratingly slow. Water main replacement often means traffic disruption, noise, and dust. We make every attempt to minimize the impact on our customers, and we hope the information you find here will be helpful.

Water Main Construction:

We have a number of project currently underway, all aimed at some of our oldest infrastructure and in cooperation with the City of Bangor and/or State of Maine.

Funding for the projects includes low-interest loans and grants through the Maine Drinking Water Program as well as our designated infrastructure replacement account, funded through rates as allowed by the Maine Public Utilities Commission.

2018 Pipe Work
WHERE WHY WHAT ESTIMATE
State, Exchange, and French Streets Joint project with City sewer/storm-water work and road reconstruction. Replace c. 1903, 1910, 1912 pipe with 2470’ of new pipe $920,700
Hammond Street

(Union to Cedar Street)

Joint project with City sewer work. Area of two significant water leaks. Replace c. 1915 8” pipe with 1100’ of new 12” pipe $425,000
Union Street (Hammond to West Broadway) Joint project with City sewer work. Area of significant water leaks. Replace c. 1920 6” pipe with 1700’ of new 12” pipe $846,400
Main Street

(Dutton to Hampden town line)

Improve primary feed to Hampden, and upsize for future development. Road scheduled for repaving in 2020. Replace c. 1910 6” and 8” pipe with 3600” of 16” pipe $1,811,000

 

Water Main Flushing: Not being done in 2018.

Every other summer, we flush all of our water mains in six towns. Opening a hydrant draws the water through the pipe at a higher-than-usual speed, allowing any sediment to be flushed away. The sediment is a corrosion byproduct associated with pipe materials (such as iron). Although the water may look discolored after we flush the lines in your area, it is always safe to use. The color will clear when the water is run for a few minutes after flushing is completed in your neighborhood.

While we are flushing, we are also inspecting the hydrants, checking the flow rates (important for fire fighting), and conducting tests in the area for any undetected leaks.

Generally, signs on sawhorses are placed a day in advance in the affected neighborhood.